A Year Under an Oak: The Great White Oak

Throughout most of the forested temperate eastern North America Quercus alba, the white oak grows. The white oak is not the tallest, widest, or most handsome tree. Instead, it is robust and adaptable. White oaks in the eastern forests grow to hundreds of years old and often outlive many trees that might grow in their shade, waiting for a canopy opening. I’ve always been fond of the white oak’s habit of growing a wide, open crown, and with age, they become a grizzled old veteran of the changing forest around them.

The forest white oak’s branches spread about 50 feet wide.

The white oak has a light grey bark that flakes and sheds on upper branches and from the trunk. White oak acorns start growing the same season that they reach the ground. A long taproot emerges and anchors the seedling. The first leaves emerge the following spring.

In Schenley Park, there are several white oaks. Though not as numerous as the red oak, they are adaptable to many soil conditions. Some are planted and pruned on green, grassy lawns and others are residents of the more dense forest where close neighbor trees compete for the available light several meters up. This leads to different growth forms depending on the available light.

In the forest, where the bright summer sun comes mostly from overhead, most trees grow fairly straight upward. As they grow taller, lower branches are naturally pruned when taller branches shade them out. A tree won’t waste energy growing a branch full of leaves if there isn’t enough of a benefit to compensate for the growth and maintenance. Tall and rather straight oak trees are the result of years of work to fill in a canopy gap.

A white oak growing on a golf course in the open. This oak’s branches spread about 100 feet.

In an open area a tree has room to grow. This is really where the form, or growing habit, of a tree is obvious. A white oak, for instance, has a round, wide shape. An elm is usually vase-shaped with branches spreading widest at the top. Spruce and fir are typically pyramid-shaped, like the classic Christmas tree. The forest oak will grow taller than the oak in the open, but there isn’t much of a benefit to gaining height in the open area where there is no competition from neighboring trees.

The oak I have chosen to observe is a forest oak. It is tall and slender, not a giant by any means, but it grows in a small grove of seven or eight other white oak trees. This is no monoculture, of course. The trees are threatened by neighboring red oaks, sugar maples, and hickories. These other species are saplings of 10-15 feet, but if enough of a canopy gap is available, they’ll easily shoot up to fill it and become competition for the white oak.

The forest floor is typical for a dry wooded slope. Some grasses are presenting seedheads, white snakeroot is showing glamorous white umbels of flowers, and modestly adorned wood asters are in bloom. Here and there are remnants of the spring wildflowers–the leafed stalks of solomon’s seal take in the last of the summer’s sun.

Despite the bustle of Saturday hikers, bikers, and joggers in the park, I can also hear the rustle of chipmunks and squirrels. Chickadees and titmice chatter in the treetops, skimming insects from leaves and branches. Piles of green acorn husks are a sure sign that summer is waning and the time to prepare for winter is here.

Author: astanyoung

I'm a natural history educator and outdoor enthusiast. I want to help people understand and enjoy the natural world that we live in.

One thought on “A Year Under an Oak: The Great White Oak”

  1. Quercus alba has always been one of my favorite trees–I’m not sure why. I think its rounded leaf lobes make it look more classically “oak-y” than the pointed lobes of Quercus rubra. There was a HUGE white oak in the courtyard outside my dorm room one year in college. It must have been well over 100 years old. I loved that tree. It was so beautiful and majestic in every season.

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